ATMs in Thailand Hacked; 12 Million Baht Stolen; 10,000 ATMs Prone to Hackers

An Eastern European gang of criminals has stolen over 12 Million Baht (approximately US$350,000) from a total of 21 ATMs in Bangkok and other five provinces by hacking a Thai bank's ATM network; police said Wednesday

The Central Bank of Thailand (BoT) has issued a warning to all commercial banks about security flaws in roughly 10,000 ATMs that were exploited to steal cash from the machines.

The warning came shortly after the state-owned Government Savings Bank (GSB) shut down approximately 3,000 of their ATMs following an ongoing police investigation into the recent hack in which hackers were able to infect many its cash machines with malware.

Thailand has suffered its first ATM Hack!
Thailand has suffered its first ATM Hack!

GSB found that millions of Thailand Baht were stolen between August 1 and 8 from 21 ATMs across the provinces of Bangkok, Phuket, Chumphon, Prachuap Khiri Khan, Phetchaburi, and Surat Thani, the Bangkok Post reports.

The hackers made over 12.29 Million Thailand Baht (US$346,000) by inserting cards installed with malware into multiple ATMs to spew out cash, up to 40,000 Baht each transaction.

GSB President Chartchai Payuhanaveechai told the local media that the bank has reviewed security camera footage and identified potential suspects as foreign nationals who infected their cash machines with malware that forced them to dispense cash.

Payuhanaweechai also ensured its customers that they are not affected by the theft as the gang's malware only tricked the bank ATMs to release cash without authorization, not from customers' accounts.
Thai police suspect a ring of at least 25 Eastern European nationals committed the crime and link them to a similar hacking theft occurred last month when the top eight banks in Taiwan were forced to shut down hundreds of its ATMS after thieves used malware to steal NT$70 Million ($2.17 Million) in cash.

Source : http://thehackernews.com/2016/08/thailand-atm-hack.html

Tags :
hacked atm, hacked atm cars, hacked atm spew cash, hacked atm machine, hacked atm thailand

Migrating DNS servers from Linux to Windows (Part 1)

Introduction


A properly functioning Domain Name Services (DNS) infrastructure is essential for Active Directory environments. The simplest way of course to set up DNS name servers with Active Directory is to install and configure the DNS Server role on your Windows Server domain controllers. For various reasons however, some organizations already have deployed or may choose to deploy Linux name servers running the Berkeley Internet Name Daemon (BIND) implementation of DNS.

Linux BIND servers are lightweight and fast name servers that are easy to manage if you have basic knowledge of Linux administration, and provided they're running modern versions of BIND they're also interoperable with Active Directory domain controllers. In larger organizations there may also be political reasons for keeping your existing BIND servers instead of migrating them to Windows Server DNS. For example, the administrators of your current DNS infrastructure may be unwilling to relinquish their control over DNS to Active Directory admins. And when two companies merge or an acquisition occurs, existing cultures of Linux and Windows Server administration may clash.

The TechNet documentation on migrating from BIND to Windows Server DNS has been around since Windows Server 2003 but has not been updated since Windows Server 2008 so it's well worth revisiting the subject. The documentation is also sparse and provides only minimal guidance on the actual steps involved in such migrations. Because of this, I've asked my colleague Todd Lamothe to walk us through the steps involved in migrating a DNS zone from a Linux BIND name server to a Windows server running the DNS Server role. Todd is the principal consultant for Nattrac Consulting Ltd. where he does IT consulting focusing on Windows deployments, Windows Server technology, Azure Cloud and Exchange / Office 365 deployments. He has been working in the IT field for 20 years, and you can find out more about him at http://www.about.me/ToddLamothe. Todd has also contributed content in the past to our WServerNews newsletter, for example see his guest editorial on data deduplication in Windows Server 2012 in Issue #942 of our newsletter. Let's now watch Todd as he walks us through the migration process.

Walkthrough of BIND to Windows DNS migration

In this article, I am going to walk you through the steps to migrate off a Linux box for DNS and migrate services to a Windows Server 2012 R2 computer. I am doing this currently for one of my customers who is hosting their DNS on an out of date Red Hat Linux server. We are then using a third party to manage the DNS traffic and our master server provides zone updates to those machines and does not serve any public traffic.

Preparing the Linux box

On the Linux box we need to ensure that zone transfers to the new Windows boxes are allowed.

Edit the named.conf file, which in this server’s case is located in /etc/named. For each of the domains that we wish to migrate to the new server we should check that there is a line, which is written like this example:

allow-transfer { 192.168.1.8; };

Figure 1: Step 1 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
This grants permission to this DNS server to allow a zone transfer to another box. Any current secondary servers will need to be here and we need to add the IP of our server. Once we have added the IP address of our new Windows Server 2012 R2 server for each domain, we are ready to move on to the next step of preparing the Windows Server.

Preparing the Windows Server

Install Windows, name the box and give it an IP address. The IP you give it should match what you configured in Linux for the allow transfer.

Next add the DNS Server role to the server, once it is added, open the DNS console.

Figure 2: Step 2 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
Figure 2: Step 2 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
Right-click on Forward Lookup Zones and then add the first domain. In my first example I am using carttan.ca:

Figure 3: Step 3 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
Figure 3: Step 3 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
Click Next:

Figure 4: Step 4 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
Figure 4: Step 4 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
Click on Secondary Zone and click Next:

Figure 5: Step 5 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
Figure 5: Step 5 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
Enter in the DNS name for the zone you are creating. Then click Next:

Figure 6: Step 6 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
Figure 6: Step 6 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
Enter in the IP Address of the Master DNS server, press enter and then when it goes green, click Next. If it doesn’t go green, then there is an issue and check the Linux server:

Figure 7: Step 7 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
Figure 7: Step 7 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
Click Finish to close the wizard and return to the DNS Manager console:

Figure 8: Step 8 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
Figure 8: Step 8 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
Check that the records are coming across properly.

Repeat these steps for each and every domain that needs to be migrated.

Promoting the Windows Server to Primary Master for the DNS Zone

Right click on the Zone and go to properties to convert from Secondary to Master Server:

Figure 9: Step 9 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
Figure 9: Step 9 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
Click on Change:

Figure 10: Step 10 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
Figure 10: Step 10 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
Click on Primary Zone and click OK.

Next click on the Zone Transfers tab:

Figure 11: Step 11 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
Figure 11: Step 11 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
Click on Allow Zone Transfers and click on Only To The Following Servers. Click Edit and enter the information for the servers you want to be secondary servers. These will be the servers you direct internet traffic to. These could be secondary servers hosted anywhere. I have also configured my firewall to allow DNS traffic to these servers only.

Next we will configure the Start of Authority record. We need to change the primary server. Here we will use one of our external responding servers as our primary. Also set the Responsible person and be sure to increment the serial number once you are complete with the changes:

Figure 12: Step 12 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
Figure 12: Step 12 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.

Setting up the Secondary DNS Servers

Install Windows, name the box and give it an IP address.

Next add the DNS Server role to the server, once it is added, open the DNS console. This should be familiar as these are the steps we’ve already completed with setting up the master DNS server:

Figure 13: Step 13 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
Figure 13: Step 13 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
Right-click on Forward Lookup Zones and then add the first domain. Again, in my example, I am using carttan.ca:

Figure 14: Step 14 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
Figure 14: Step 14 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
Click Next:

Figure 15: Step 15 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
Figure 15: Step 15 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
Click on Secondary Zone and click Next. The steps to follow are identical to what we first completed when we setup the first Windows Server prior to making it a master server.

Check that the records are coming across properly. Repeat these steps for each domain that needs to be migrated.

Create a new record for your external DNS servers. These need to be addresses that are externally routable (which I have not used in my example here), next add them into your DNS servers in the Name Servers tab removing the one server that is listed for internal. In my example I only have one server showing up now:

Figure 16: Step 16 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
Figure 16: Step 16 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
As you can see in the above example, there is no mention of ns1.carttan.ca which is the master server for these domains. Next let’s turn off DNS resolution for any domain which we do not host. Right click on the name of the server and go to the advanced tab. Check Disable recursion:

Figure 17: Step 17 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
Figure 17: Step 17 of migrating a Linux BIND name server to a Windows Server DNS server.
The final steps to complete are changing your internet registration files so that the DNS servers are pointed to the new external servers.

Conclusion

In the second article of this two-part series we'll examine some other issues associated with migrating DNS from BIND to Windows Server and will provide some additional resources on the topic.

Tags : windows 2008 bind ip address, windows 2008 bind order, windows 2008 bind secondaries, windows 2008 dns bind secondaries, windows 2008 bind, windows 2008 r2 bind dns, windows 2008 anonymous bind, windows 2008 dhcp bind interface, windows 2008 dns bind, windows 2008 nic bind order

DOTA 2 SUN WUKONG The Monkey King! New Hero Reveal

Hot news for player DOT2, that in the event TI6 this time Valve introduces another new hero Mokey KING or better known as Sun Wukong, after previously informing valve will release Underlord or Pit Lord in the name Dota dota pengemar 1. when the two berfiki Pit Lord which will be released turn Valve give a surprise return.

DOT 2 SUN WUKONG The Monkey King! New Hero Reveal

Sun Wukong is a very iconic character china and historic. Known as the Monkey King in Indonesia, Sun Wukong often linked or referred similar to Phantom Lancer where his style could transform themselves into many very well suited to the character Sun Wukong that can also turn into a lot. But apparently Phantom Lancer not the Monkey King.



MOBA game Dota 2 was very successful and had a player continuously play this game from time to time. This time Valve is the developer of the official Dota 2 is holding the biggest tournament Dota 2 The International, 2016.

Tags : GAMES, NEWS, POPULAR, DOTA 2, SUN WUKONG, NEWS PLAYER DOTA 2

Testing time for cryptocurrency security as Bitfinex reports $65m of bitcoin stolen by hackers

Hong Kong-based Bitcoin exchange Bitfinex reported that hackers have stolen some 119,756 Bitcoin, or about $65m in cash at current prices - the latest security compromise involving cryptocurrency, in what is turning out to be a testing year.

The enormous $65m bitcoin theft follows on from a similar amount in Ethereum's currency ether, which was exploited by a coding weakness in the smart contract system of the DAO about a month and a half ago.

News of the security breach sent the price of bitcoin crashing to around $500, but it has subsequently rallied to $535 leaving it down 12% for the day.

Bitfinex is the largest exchange by volume on the BTC-USD pair representing about 50% of volume.


bitcoin - Hackers have stolen some 119,756 bitcoin or about $65m in cash at current prices

Bitfinex stated on its website: "Today we discovered a security breach that requires us to halt all trading on Bitfinex, as well as halt all digital token deposits to and withdrawals from Bitfinex.

"We are investigating the breach to determine what happened, but we know that some of our users have had their bitcoins stolen. We are undertaking a review to determine which users have been affected by the breach.

"While we conduct this initial investigation and secure our environment, bitfinex.com will be taken down and the maintenance page will be left up. The theft is being reported to — and we are co-operating with — law enforcement."

Bitfinex was hacked last year in May when 1,459 bitcoins were lost. Their hot wallet system for customer deposits was breached, which at the time represented 0.5% of all customer deposits. Bitfinex subsequently teamed up with BitGo to implement individual multi signature wallets for users.

The Bitfinex theft is the second largest Bitcoin hack to occur after Mt.Gox in early 2014, which saw a total of 850,000 bitcoin lost. This hack occurred through a technical term known as transaction malleability where the exchange was duped into re-sending withdrawals which were changed before being submitted to the network for validation.

Bitstamp was hacked in 2015 with the loss of 19,000 bitcoin. which represented 12% of its total bitcoin deposits at the exchange. The Bitstamp hack was carried out through a sophisticated targeting of employees using malware that ultimately gave hackers access to servers containing Bitstamp's hot wallet funds.

It's certainly turning out to be a testing year for cryptocurrency security. The DAO hack saw some $60m of ether compromised from a smart contract which led to Ethereum implementing a hard fork. Shapeshift lost over $230,000 due to a disgruntled ex-employee with access to internal systems.

Gatecoin, also headquartered in Hong Kong, was hacked in May to the tune of $2m (250 bitcoin and 185,000 ether). The hacker managed to bypass the exchange's control limits whereby only 5% of customer deposits were stored in the hot wallet by routing new deposits into the hot wallet too.

Charles Hayter, CEO and founder of CrytoCompare told IBTimes UK: "It is not clear on what the capital buffers are at Bitfinex, although if we take last year's figures of 300,000 bitcoin and apply a generous doubling, we can speculate that 20% of all funds have been lost.

"With users' funds secured using multisignature technology in partnership with BitGo a lot more is at stake for the backbone of the Bitcoin industry with its stalwarts and prided tech under fire.

"With uncertainty comes volatility. With the block reward halving out of the way there is no clear path for bitcoin especially with divisions reappearing on the scaling debate. This Bitfinex hack muddies the waters again for Bitcoin and opens up raw wounds in echoes of Mt Gox."

Bitfinex volume on the BTC-USD Pair is usually around 30-60K BTC per day. Today the trailing 24 hour volume is over 150K BTC.

Market shares are already shifting with Bitstamp resuming its dominant position with a 14% market share, although this is closely followed by BTCe and Coinbase both with 13% of the market each, according to CryproCompare

Setting Up a SysLog Server for Cisco by Kiwi SysLog Server

Hey what’s up? Can we have some discussion about Syslog Configuration on Cisco Router? You may hear about server monitor software and other log monitoring tools. I would like to figure out some best free syslog server for Cisco router and switches. Syslog monitoring is the life blood of Cisco administrators; they will have real time view of the switch or router which they are managing. Kiwi syslog server free edition from SolarWinds syslog server supports up to 5 syslog sources to monitor real time.
In this tutorial let me explain about free cisco syslog server by SolarWinds Kiwi syslog server.

How to Setup Syslog Server with Kiwi

The first thing you may have to download Kiwi Syslog server from SolarWinds and configure syslog server to receive event log from any Cisco router.

Download: - Kiwi Syslog Server Free

File Names:
Kiwi-Syslog-Server-Free.zip: Free Edition
Kiwi-Syslog-Server-9.4.1-Eval.zip: Commercial Edition Evaluation 14 days

I just proceed with free tool, alternatively you can get 14 day fully functional trial for Kiwi Syslog Server Commercial Edition which supports many more features. Kiwi Syslog web access is a cool feature of commercial edition. I will be explaining Kiwi Syslog web access in upcoming articles.

Other Kiwi Products can be seen here: www.kiwisyslog.com/downloads.aspx

Installation of Kiwi free syslog server is just like any other program, you can either choose Install Kiwi Syslog server as a Service or Install Kiwi Syslog server as an Application. Read the description in the installation window to realize these options.

Kiwi SysLog Server installation Setting Up a SysLog Server for Cisco by Kiwi SysLog Server



After successful installation run Kiwi Syslog Server Console from start menu or desktop.

Kiwi Syslog Server Console Setting Up a SysLog Server for Cisco by Kiwi SysLog Server

Kiwi syslog server free

Configure Kiwi Log Viewer

Go to File → Setup → Input
Now add the IP Address from where you want to get syslog messages. It could be a router or switch.


Add Sources Kiwi Syslog Server Setting Up a SysLog Server for Cisco by Kiwi SysLog Server

Kiwi Syslog Configuration Cisco Router

The free syslog server is ready to run now; the remaining thing is the configuration for the router to send Cisco syslog messages to the Kiwi syslog server. Syslog configuration for Cisco router is pretty easy, can be accomplished in 2 lines of commands.

Router#conf t
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)#service timestamps log datetime localtime
Router(config)#logging 192.168.56.101
Router(config)#exit




Syslog Configuration Cisco Router Setting Up a SysLog Server for Cisco by Kiwi SysLog Server


Cisco syslog messages are UDP protocol and uses syslog port 514 as default. In Kiwi, there is option available to listen TCP syslog messages as well.

Cisco Syslog messages

After this configuration router will send Syslog messages to Kiwi server and we can notice real-time changes in the Kiwi panel.


Cisco syslog messages Setting Up a SysLog Server for Cisco by Kiwi SysLog Server

Cisco Syslog messages

Well, we have seen best syslog server for Cisco, what’s your view about Kiwi syslog server for Cisco?

Hope this post informative for you; I will be covering Kiwi syslog web access on next article. Like our Facebook page to get update as soon as possible…

Pokemon Go has added nearly $11 billion to the value of Nintendo since its release WOW

Nostalgic millennials are in love with Pokemon Go. So are Nintendo investors.
After players enjoyed their first full weekend roaming about their neighborhoods capturing virtual Pokemon, Nintendo’s share price has soared. The stock opened today (July 11) at 18,595 Japanese yen ($182.1) per share, up 14% from its closing price on Friday. When trading on the Tokyo Stock Exchange closed, the price had hit 20,260 yen ($198.41), a day-to-day increase of 24.52%.

The company is now valued at 2.87 trillion yen, or $28 billion, a 63.7% jump from its $17.1 billion closing valuation on Wednesday (July 6). (Pokemon Go was released in Australia and New Zealand on July 6, and then in the United States the following day.)

Nintendo shares still have a long way to go before they reach their former heights, however. On October 30, 2007, about one year after the Wii home console came out, Nintendo stock was worth $625 per share, valuing the company at $79.9 billion.

Back then, Nintendo’s business consisted of selling hardware that plugged into a television. As consumers started to get their gaming fix on smartphones, Nintendo suffered from flagging sales.
Pokemon Go marks Nintendo’s second-ever mobile title (the first is a Kafkaesque social networking game called Miitomo). Smartphone owners have flocked to it, coming for the nostalgia and staying for the game play, which turns one’s immediate surroundings into a hunting ground for creatures. The game’s servers have crashed repeatedly from the overload.
It’s not clear if Pokemon Go and other mobile titles can help revive the company in the long run. To do so, Nintendo needs to transition from a company that makes most of its money from hardware and discs to a company that makes its money from tiny $0.99 transactions.
But smartphone owners have short attention spans. Mobile game companies like King and Zynga saw their stock prices plummet after they failed to recreate one-hit wonders like Candy Crush Saga and Words With Friends. Nintendo could easily join their ranks if the Pokemon Go craze fades.